Fore!


I have had a lot of jobs in my time.  The best job I ever had was the job where I got paid to play golf.  After returning from an internship in Japan, I went to work for a Japanese fellow who opened a hotel catering to Japanese parts subcontractors who sold parts to Boeing.  After working at the hotel for about six months, I got accepted to attend the University of Washington Law School beginning in the fall of 1991.  So I told my Japanese boss that I would be leaving in four months and I understood if he had to let me go.  Being the great guy he was, he said I needed to save money for law school and therefore I should work for him as a tour guide catering to employees of his hotels back home in Japan who got to visit Seattle as reward for their hard work.

Beginning in June of 1991, each week on Sunday I would drive to Sea-Tac airport and pick up seven fellas and drive them back to the hotel.  Then Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday I would drive them to golf courses like Semiahmoo, Port Ludlow, and other nice courses and fill out their second foursome playing golf.  If only I could have kept that job forever.

I have always been a fairly pathetic golfer.  I can hit my irons pretty well and can putt ok but my driver and wedges have always been a complete disaster.  I pretty much don’t hit a driver anymore which means I am always at a bit of a disadvantage off the tee.  I am currently laboring under the illusion that my problem is that I have never used a driver made by members of our extended American family.  If only I could get my paws on such a driver, I would be hitting it like John Daly.

Well it turns out I am not the only one who was interested in finding American made golf equipment.  Jack A has been a fan of my blog since its inception last year.  I have been a fan of Jack’s blog, clothingmadeinusablog, since about the same time.  If you are looking for the scoop on clothing made in America, Jack’s blog is the site for you!  Jack had been researching American golf equipment and was gracious enough to provide me with the fruit of his labors.  Thanks alot Jack!

Callaway Golf

According to Callaway, the majority of Callaway Golf clubs are assembled in the United States at Callaway’s plant in Carlsbad.

TaylorMade 

The components in TaylorMade clubs are made in China and assembled in the USA.

Titleist

Titleist putters are manufactured in the US and assembled in the US.  Titleist irons and woods are manufactured in Asia and assembled in the US.  Titleist golf balls are also all manufactured in the US.

Ping

Ping makes its golf club heads at their foundry in Phoenix, Arizona, including many of the heads for our G20 and G15 irons; their Eye2 XG wedges; a number of putters, and replacement clubs for most of the models they have offered over their 50+ years.  Some Ping driver components are made overseas, but the drivers are assembled here in the States.

So it’s kinda a mixed golf bag when it comes to golf equipment.  Some clubs are completely manufactured and assembled by members of our extended American golfing family, but a lot of other clubs consist of components made abroad but assembled here.  In my mind, the clubs with the highest amount of domestic content would be my club of choice, but better assembled here with some foreign content than clubs made and assembled abroad.  But that’s just my opinion.  How about you?  Do you think a club that isn’t made of 100% American components and assembled here doesn’t deserve to be called an American golf club?  Tell me what you think, I am very interested to know.  Oh, and even after that last putt, you are still away.  Sorry.

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About tapirking

I live in Seattle and love telling stories about Americans, the places where they work and the things that they make.
This entry was posted in american made, Made in America, made in usa, recreation and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Fore!

  1. Don’t forget Allen Edmonds makes a number of different golf shoes, all made in the USA. -Jack A

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