Pitter patter of little feet II


Seattle is the second busiest port on the west coast after Los Angeles.  As you might imagine, lots of Chinese goods enter the U.S. through the Port of Seattle.

Recently, one particular shipment of Chinese goods into Seattle was in the news.  1,700 pairs of children’s shoes, contaminated with three times the legal limit for lead, were seized by U.S. customs agents at the Port of Seattle.  Exposure to lead is very dangerous to children.

One of the reasons I avoid products from China, if I can, is that I have zero confidence regarding what inputs are used to construct the toy, shoe or gadget.  I would no more eat food from China than fly to the moon.  The recall record for Chinese products is impressive.  I don’t know about you, but I was particularly saddened by the recall of the Chinese made dancing teapots due to a burn hazard.

We all need a small bright spot in our day, and I am convinced that a dancing teapot could have supplied that for me.  But alas, I can not have my Chinese dancing teapot because it has been recalled.  Life is a constant source of disappointment.

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About tapirking

I live in Seattle and love telling stories about Americans, the places where they work and the things that they make.
This entry was posted in China, shoes, Trade and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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