Not that kind of American Field!


Fields

I haven’t posted in quite a while, but it wasn’t laziness on my part I assure you.  Rather, I have been working like a strap on my new website Homerica.  Homerica is your one stop for everything you need for your American home; it will truly be an American home since every product featured on Homerica is made by members of our extended American family.  I have also been blogging on Homerica’s blog, Stories of Home, so I urge you to start following that blog as well as this one!

I recently became aware of an interesting bunch that is promoting American brands at four pop up markets over the next few months.  American Field is holding events in Boston (September 12-13th), Washington D.C. (October 17-18th), Atlanta (October 31-November 1st) and Brooklyn (November 21-22nd).  If you are an American maker, you can become an American Field vendor; the pricing for the events is very reasonable.  $750 for a basic booth, $1,500 for a premium double booth.  If you are an American crafted product aficionado, you can show up to (1) buy great American products, (2) visit with other American kindred souls, (3) talk to a slew of great American makers and (4) eat and drink with said American kindred souls and American makers.  And the price of admission is …….nada.  Just show up and engage in the four activities set forth above.

American Field was started by Mark Bollman, the owner of Ball and Buck.  Ball and Buck is based in Boston and makes lots of clothing for American fellas.  American Field plays a critical role, in my opinion, in allowing ordinary Americans to meet American makers and allowing American makers a inexpensive outlet for selling their wares and connecting with American consumers.  Last year, 7500 people attended American Field’s two pop up markets.  This year more than 120 American brands have joined American Field and the numbers are on the rise.  God only knows how many people will attend this year’s four American Field markets, but given the fact that American Field has been getting a lot of press recently, the numbers will probably be huge.

So I urge you to attend one of American Field’s four pop up markets this year, meet the makers, eat a lot and support the members of our extended American family by purchasing the products they craft.

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About tapirking

I live in Seattle and love telling stories about Americans, the places where they work and the things that they make.
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3 Responses to Not that kind of American Field!

  1. Great to see you back. -Jack A

  2. Pingback: Not that kind of American Field! | simplyamericandotnet | clothingmadeinusablog

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